When kittens are first born, they are helpless—they cannot see, hear, keep themselves warm, or eliminate waste on their own. They fit in the palm of your hand and weigh 3-5 ounces. Kittens like Darling, and his siblings, are completely dependent on their mother (or you!) for protection, warmth, and nutrition. Even so, these kittens can purr and make distress calls. They spend 90 percent of their time sleeping and the other 10 percent eating.

A kitten weight chart or growth chart is an important tool to help gauge proper kitten development. With or without their mother cat, a kitten should grow steadily, at certain rates, and a variety of changes should occur within a certain time frame. The biggest indicator that a kitten is developing properly starts with weight gain, according to a kitten weight chart.

Your kitten’s weight and growth is important for their wellbeing, so it’s a good idea to track how much they’re progressing. The best way to keep track of your kitten is to weigh them regularly so that you can distinguish between healthy increases in weight and any worrying losses which could be a sign of an underlying issue.

What Does My Kitten Growth Chart Mean?

Weight can be the number one indicator of problems in many cats, but where kittens are concerned, this is especially true. Kittens growvery rapidly, because in the wild, they would be expected to be weaned and fending for themselves by the time they are 12-16 weeks old. A kitten that is not growing is usually sick or may not be getting enough nutrition.

If kittens are still with their mom, it’s possible that there’s a health problem with mom as well. If you’re feeding orphaned kittens, you may not be doing so often enough and/or there could be an issue with your formula, for instance. In any case, if a kitten is not gaining 1.75 to 3.5 ounces every week, he or she should be examined by your veterinarian right away.

How Much Does A Newborn Kitten Weigh?

A newborn kitten weighs around 100g – the same as a bar of chocolate. With a body length of around 4 inches, it comfortably fits in the hand of an adult human.

Birth weight depends, amongst other things, on the breed of the parents and the size of the litter. Kittens from a large litter are generally smaller and lighter than kittens from a small litter. A Norwegian Forest cat already weighs more than a Siamese, for instance.

The mother’s living conditions during her pregnancy play a role. Stress, illness and poor nutrition can have a negative influence on kittens when they are born. On the other hand, a well-balanced and well-fed cat mother will probably give birth to heavier offspring

Can You Tell How Big A Kitten Will Get?

Unlike dogs that can vary in size from Chihuahuas to Great Danes, cats don’t have huge variations in size between breeds. Still, though, there is some variation. Some cats can be more than twice as big as others, depending on their genetics and other factors. An average adult cat weighs 10 pounds, but some petite cats can weigh closer to 5 or 6 pounds and other equally as healthy cats can tip the scales at over 25 pounds. 

Get to know what’s normal for your unique pet. That way you’ll notice if your cat is gaining or losing weight.

How Fast Does A Kitten Grow?

Growing kittens under 6 months of age will weigh approximately their age in months. So, a 2-month-old kitten should weigh approximately 2 pounds, a 3-month-old kitten should average 3 pounds, and so on.

Don’t worry if your young kitten doesn’t follow this weight formula exactly, though. Each pet is unique. As long as your kitty has a clean bill of health from your veterinarian, your pet is on the right track. 

A kitten’s weight at 6 months of age and older is more variable between individual cats, since they are starting to get closer to their adult size and may grow at different rates.

What If My Kitten Is Losing Weight?

It’s always best to err on the side of caution and talk to your vet — especially if an underweight kitten also has symptoms of illness.

Kittens are still growing, meaning their immune systems are not fully developed and they’re much more susceptible than adults to parasites, viruses, and other infections (this is why it’s important to vaccinate your cat). Plus, they can become ill very quickly so it’s best to check with your vet ASAP.

Can Kittens Be Overweight?

Yes, this is possible. Common causes include overfeeding, overindulgence in treats or table scraps, a sedentary lifestyle, or changes in weight after a spay or neuter surgery.

Being overweight as a youngster often translates to obesity in adulthood, and all of the associated health risks like arthritis, diabetes, or heart and lung conditions.

If you feel your kitten may be overweight, don’t restrict their food right away. Instead, talk to your vet about the best weight management plan for your fur baby, and schedule frequent weight check-ins.

When Should You Weigh Your Kitten?

We recommend that you weigh your kitten whenever it’s having a major growth spurt (i.e. when it goes through a significant change in size or weight) or if you think something is wrong.

If you start to notice how much your kitten is growing and changing, then weighing them every week will really help you track their progress and catch any problems early before they turn serious.

How To Weigh A Kitten?

The most practical will be to use a baby scale if you have one. Otherwise a simple kitchen scale will do! It goes without saying that before and after use you will need to wash the scale well and disinfect it.

How Often Should A Kitten Weigh?

If you have adopted an unweaned kitten then less than 2 months old (strongly discouraged), your kitten is extremely fragile and its weight must be controlled and closely monitored.

How Much Should A 2-Month-Old Kitten Weigh?

By the time they’re 2 months old, your kittens should weigh between 600g and 900g. They may start to get a little cheeky around this time, as they try to develop their independence and start to explore everything around them.

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