Spring onions are a great way to add flavor to your meals, but you don’t have to wait for spring to enjoy them. Preserving them is simple: just wash the onions and trim off any bruised or damaged parts. Then blanch them in boiling water for about 2 minutes (or until they’re tender). Drain them, and let them cool before placing them in an airtight container and storing in the fridge.

Pickling: Pickling preserves the texture, color, and flavor of an onion for up to a year. You can use this technique on most types of onions, including shallots and leeks. To pickle your spring onions, peel and slice them into thin rounds or small cubes before packing them into sterilized jars with salt, vinegar, and water. Tightly seal the jars with lids or caps and store them in a dark place at room temperature for 1 week before using them.

Freeze: Freezing preserves both the texture and flavor of fresh spring onions but doesn’t preserve their color as well as other preservation methods like pickling or drying. To freeze your spring onions, simply wash them thoroughly before cutting them into strips or slices and placing them on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Place the baking sheet in the freezer until they’re frozen solid then transfer them to freezer bags or containers for long-term storage until needed again later on down the road when you want to make something delicious using fresh ingredients instead of canned ones.

Spring onions are a delicious and healthy addition to all kinds of dishes. They add a bright, oniony flavour that can complement potatoes or pasta, and they’re easy to grow yourself if you have the space. However, spring onions only last for about a week once they’ve been picked. If you want to keep them around longer, we recommend preserving them using this simple method.

(1) Wash your spring onions thoroughly and remove the roots.

  • Wash your spring onions thoroughly and remove the roots.
  • Rinse them again in cold water to remove any dirt or residue left on the onion after washing it.
  • Dry the onion well with a clean towel before placing it into your storage jar.
  • If you are planning on storing your spring onions for an extended period of time (more than 1 year), consider using a glass or ceramic jar instead of plastic as chemicals from plastic containers can leech into foods over time and change their natural flavor, color, or texture.

(2) Let them dry completely. Then cut off the top ¾ of the green part.

Once you have your onions completely dry, you can cut off the green part. You want to cut off the top ¾ of the green part. This will leave a white base that will store well in a jar. It is best to cut them at their base rather than remove them from their tops, as they were originally grown. Leave 3cm of space at the top of each jar so that there is room for expansion when storing them in there.

All jars should be sealed before storing them, as this prevents any unwanted air or moisture from entering into your storage unit and affecting its contents (which would spoil them).

Make sure to store all preserved foods in cool places with limited light exposure, such as basements and dark closets with doors closed tightly against outside sources like sunlight streaming through windows during daylight hours; otherwise not only do onions lose some nutritional value over time due to exposure—they’ll also get rotten faster than if properly stored away from direct sunlight.

(3) Fill a jar with your onions, leaving about 3 cm space at the top.

  • Fill a jar with your onions, leaving about 3 cm space at the top. It’s best to use a jar that has an airtight lid and is easy to store and transport. If you don’t have one handy, try using a glass container instead.
  • If you’re storing your onions in a glass jar, make sure it doesn’t contain any liquid (and if it does, pour out the liquid). Otherwise, it might cause corrosion on the inside of your storage container.
  • Don’t cut up or chop up your spring onions before storing them—you don’t want them to rot from being exposed to air or moisture.
  • You can use either metal or plastic containers for preserving food—but only if they are BPA-free. Metal containers may corrode over time due to contact with salt water; plastic ones may absorb odors from foods stored in them previously (like garlic) which could transfer onto other foodstuffs placed into these containers later on down the line too

(4) Get a pot and put some water in it. Put your jar of spring onions on a small plate in the pot and let it simmer for about 15 minutes.

  • Get a pot and put some water in it. Put your jar of spring onions on a small plate in the pot and let it simmer for about 15 minutes.
  • Remove from heat and let cool down.

(5) Take the pot and your onions off the heat and leave the jars to cool down for about an hour.

  • Leave the pot and your onions off the heat and leave the jars to cool down for about an hour.
  • Don’t leave them for too long or they will spoil, but don’t let them cool down too quickly either. If you find that your jar is not completely cooled (i.e., if it still feels quite warm when you touch it), then add some more water and do another boil cycle with a lid on this time so that everything gets sterilized again.
  • Once your spring onion has cooled down, carefully pour any excess liquid out of the jar using a spoon (or even better, using a funnel). If there is space left in your jar after all this liquid has been poured out, add some more water until there are no air bubbles present (air bubbles mean moldy onions).
  • Make sure that all lids have been put on properly before putting them into storage; you don’t want any bad smells from leaking out from poorly sealed containers. Also, make sure that each lid has been pushed down flush against its respective glass container—this keeps oxygen levels at bay so nothing can spoil inside. Finally (and very importantly), try adding ice cubes before placing said lids on top. This allows for faster cooling speeds which means less risk of spoilage due to bad air circulation caused by too much heat inside those vessels.

(6) Then put the top on your jar and seal it tightly with tape before storing it in a dark, cool place. You can use them as needed

After you have preserved your spring onions, they last for about a year if the jar is sealed properly. The flavour will be best when using within six months of preserving them. You can also freeze them in airtight bags and keep them there for up to 4 months.

Spring onions are a great way to add flavour to meals but they have a short shelf life unless you preserve them.

Preserving spring onions is a great way to extend their shelf life, and if you have them in your fridge for when you need to add flavour to your meals.

Spring onions are a great way to add flavour to meals but they have a short shelf life unless you preserve them. There are many ways of preserving spring onions including pickling, smoking or freezing. This article will explain how each method works and what equipment you will need before the process begins.

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